1887

A Study of Optional Questions in Examinations

The case for inclusion of optional questions in an examination is frequently argued on the grounds that a particular examination is not designed to measure whether a student possesses knowledge or facts, but whether he has developed particular abilities or skills which can be assessed independently of the particular question or questions answered. If the assumption that these skills and abilities can be assessed independently of the particular question answered is accepted, the inclusion of optional questions in a public examination allows the teacher greater freedom to develop these skills and abilities in any of a number of sections of the broad subject area, and it allows greater freedom for the individual student to pursue his interests through independent study.

English

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